What does it take to become a doctor?
We'll let you know, as we follow doctors Leah Palifka, James Knutson and Justin Routhier through their first year of residency at Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital. Track their journey in The Enterprise and here, at www.makingadoctor.com, where we'll have frequent updates.
PART V UPDATE: THE E.D.

Dr. James Knutson discusses the efforts made when trying to revive patient with a stopped heart

   After 40 minutes of trying to get a pulse, attempts to resuscitate a patient in the emergency department are ended. Dr. James Knutson, a resident at Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital, details the procedure and the effort involved when trying to bring someone back to life.
    "It's difficult. You walk into the room and try immediately to assess where you are in the spectrum between life and death. Somebody who's been down for an extended period of time with no pulse for that long, you know going into it chances are really low to get that person back," said Knutson.



Dr. James Knutson tries to clear out all his paperwork

   Dr. James Knutson talks about the other side of being a doctor: going through piles of old patient files and signing off on them in order to complete the paperwork and make everything official.



ON THE FRONT LINE: Residents take a turn in the emergency department

By Jessica Scarpati, Enterprise staff writer
   Like all the patients Dr. Leah Palifka saw in the emergency department, she knew little else about her patient except what he and his blood tests told her. But she had to figure out quickly what was wrong — asking anything and everything that might divine not just an answer, but a cure.
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Dr. Justin Routhier tries to find better ways to diagnose breast cancer

By Jessica Scarpati, Enterprise staff writer
   A woman finds a lump in her breast. Her doctor schedules an MRI — an expensive, inconvenient body scan that can take hours — to look for anything unusual in the tissue and sample it with a needle to see if it’s cancer.
   The magnetic resonance imaging machine is very sensitive — sometimes too sensitive, according to Dr. Justin Routhier, a medical intern at Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital who has been researching the way breast cancer is screened.
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