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MAPS: A before and after look

July 26, 2005: Air base plans get the final approval votes
June 28, 2005: Rockland approves air base plan
June 21, 2005: Abington approves air base plan
May 6 , 2005: Air base plan gets nod: 90-day clock running for Weymouth, Rockland and Abington
March 5, 2005: New plan calls for 54% more commercial space, boost in jobs
Feb. 2, 2005: Regional panels praise plan for reuse of air base
Jan. 26, 2005: Navy tells towns to come up with air base redevelopment plan by summer
Jan. 11, 2005: The air base plan may be less of a moneymaker than towns anticipated.
Oct. 15, 2004: EPA official finds Lennar reuse plan to be 'better for air and water quality
Oct. 1, 2004: Chairman of Tri-town Board quits, then changes his mind
Sept. 29, 2004: Executive director of Board agrees contract buyout.

TIMELINE: A look at the Tri-Town Board.

Sept. 28, 2004: Tri-Town won’t hire consultant to review plan
Sept. 25, 2004: Editorial.

Sept. 24, 2004
Air base plan: Lots of housing
MAPS: A before and after look
Graphic shows division of space
Villages to be created
Growth projected by 2017
Projected tax revenues

Biotechnology: Plan emphasizes jobs
Projected benefits for Weymouth, Abington, Rockland
Impact on roads, traffic, water, sewer, open space
New homes building schedule

Some fear plan will overburden schools
Plan puts end to rumors

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Projected benefits for Weymouth, Rockland, Abington

2008-2011

Additional taxes:  $5.5 million
School and municipal services cost:  $2.6 million
Additional K-12 students: 212
Net benefit:  $2.9 million

2011-2014

Additional taxes:  $8 million
School and municipal services cost:  $3 million
Additional students: 242
Net benefit:  $5 million

2015-2017

Additional taxes:  $5 million
School and municipal services cost:  $1.9 million
Additional students: 151
Net benefit:  $3.2 million

Total: 2008-2017

Additional taxes:  $18.6 million
Additional students: 605
Net benefit:   $11 million

Source: Lennar Partners. Estimates are in 2004 dollars.


Proposed open space and recreation

Open space including wetlands, walking and biking trails and nature observation areas – 711 acres
Eighteen-hole golf course to be built mostly in the Abington section of the base with clubhouse and pro shop – 212 acres
Fields and courts with parking for baseball, football, soccer, basketball and tennis – 57 acres
Indoor sports facility for ice hockey, racquet sports, indoor soccer and an outdoor swimming pool – 120,000 square feet.
Neighborhood squares, parks and outdoor malls – 22 acres
Total – 1,002 acres

New homes building schedule

2008-2011: Total 1,010

Townhouses – 440
Senior apartments – 300
Condominiums – 170
Garden homes – 100

2011-2014: Total 1,145

Townhouses – 440
Apartments – 275
Garden homes – 185
Condominiums – 170
Golf homes – 75

2014-2017: Total 700

Townhouses – 440
Garden homes – 185
Golf homes – 75

Total at full build out: 2,855

Apartments – 575
Condominiums – 340
Townhouses – 1,320
Single-family houses – 620

Source: Lennar Partners

 

Sept. 24, 2004

An overflow crowd listens last night as California-based Lennar Partners explains its plan for development of the former South Weymouth Naval Air Station.
RICHARD W. GREEN/For The Patriot Ledger
An overflow crowd listens last night as California-based Lennar Partners explains its plan for development of the former South Weymouth Naval Air Station.

BIOTECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY

New plan changes emphasis on jobs


The Patriot Ledger

WEYMOUTH – Fewer on-site jobs and an emphasis on the booming biotechnology industry distinguish the latest proposal for the future of the South Weymouth Naval Air Station.

Biotechnology workers earning an average annual wage of $70,000 comprise more than half the estimated 2,533 permanent jobs on the site, according to a plan presented last night.

The proposal unveiled by California-based master developer Lennar Partners bore little resemblance to a rejected plan for a shopping mall, which would have created 8,843 full-time jobs, mostly in retail.

Illustration of the Transit Village in Lennar Partners’ plan. A shuttle would circulate every 15 minutes from the village to the five other villages on the site.
Illustration of the Transit Village in Lennar Partners’ plan. A shuttle would circulate every 15 minutes from the village to the five other villages on the site.

By contrast, Lennar’s pitch centers around small-town villages flanked by biotechnology firms. The result is a plan that calls for creation of one-third of the jobs that would have existed with the shopping mall.

“This cannot be a successful community unless there are jobs on site,” said Evan Rose, a Lennar design consultant.

Creating jobs has been a chief requirement of U.S. Navy officials, who have yet to give South Shore Tri-Town Development Corp., the local redevelopment agency, the final 835 acres of the base property.

“The Navy is not going to transfer this thing on a no-cost basis unless we can establish creation of jobs,” said Greg Morrell, a Lennar vice president.

Illustration shows a four-lane parkway that would run east to west through the former air base property.
Illustration shows a four-lane parkway that would run east to west through the former air base property.

One Navy official connected with the environmental cleanup on the base suggested the Navy would want to see more jobs created as a condition for handing over the land without charge.

“The Navy would like to have more jobs than are being proposed,” said Mark Leipert, project manager for the environmental cleanup team.

The plan foresees employing from 2,874 to 6,049 union construction workers at any given point over the course of a 12-year building effort, a fact that appeared to delight dozens of labor guild members at the presentation.

Additional on-site employment includes 444 retail jobs, 462 office jobs, 200 hotel staffers, and 33 golf course workers, according to the proposal.

Illustration shows how Lennar Partners envisions the development of light industrial, biotechnology research and production facilities as part of its plan for the development of the site.
Illustration shows how Lennar Partners envisions the development of light industrial, biotechnology research and production facilities as part of its plan for the development of the site.

Jessica Van Sack may be reached by clicking here.

 

Roads

Trotter Road would be open to the public, allowing people to drive onto the property and to get from the site to the MBTA station.
South Shore Tri-Town Development Corp. is responsible for building a four-lane parkway that runs east to west through the property, connecting with Weymouth Street in Rockland.
Design work on improvements to four miles of Route 18, from Route 3 in Weymouth to Route 139 in Abington, is under way.
Work on the intersections of Route 139 and Route 18 and Pond and Pleasant streets is due to be finished by the end of 2005.
Work on Route 18 intersections with Middle and West streets and Park Avenue and Columbian Street is expected to begin in 2005. The second phase of the Route 18 work, from Shea Memorial Drive to Route 139, is expected to be finished by 2013.
Proposed work on roads east of the base includes new turn lanes on Weymouth, Sharp and Hingham streets and widening of a part of Hingham Street from two lanes to four.

Impact on traffic

Total new projected trips in and out of site New trips divided by two equals the number of vehicles added to nearby roads.

Daily trips at full build out: 20,000
Peak at rush hour: 2,000

Water

Weymouth currently supplies up to 150,000 gallons per day to the property
Lennar estimates the site will need at least 1 million gallons of water per day by 2017
Lennar proposes to tie into the MWRA system, at a cost of $25 million
South Shore Tri-Town Development Corp. would issue the bonds to pay for the tie-in and recoup its cost by charging user fees to the people and businesses on the property

Sewer

Lennar proposes to build a $15 million wastewater treatment plant on the site
South Shore Tri-Town Development Corp. would issue the bonds to pay for the plant and recoup the cost by charging user fees to residents and businesses on the property
Some of the treated wastewater will be used to irrigate playing fields and the 212-acre golf course

Source: Lennar Partners

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