Series Summary

DAY 1: (published June 28, 2003)
Quincy's growing Asian community has long relied on Chinatown for any number of services, from grocery stores to restaurants to insurance agencies. But with the opening of Asian supermarkets and retail stores, many believe the city is poised to become an ethnic crossing, where residents from Quincy and beyond come to shop, eat and do business. In other words, an alternative to Chinatown. Read story....

The Asian community continues to grow. But the people coming to Quincy are different than the ones who arrived 15 years ago. Instead of hailing from Hong Kong, newer immigrants are from places like Fujian. Mandarin, not Cantonese, is increasingly common. Read story....

The Zous are representative of many Asian-Americans in Quincy: Connected to their heritage but accustomed to American life. Read story....


DAY 2: (published June 30, 2003)
Flushing has its own mini-Chinatown, and Quincy could ultimately be similar. How did the one in NY develop and what lessons can be learned? What Flushing has that Quincy doesn’t. Read story....

Asian American Bank is making a foray into Quincy, opening its first branch here. This story will look at why provide background on the bank, and explore how unique it is to have a bank that caters to such a specific niche. Read story....


DAY 3: (published July 1, 2003)
No longer do residents hear much about eggs being launched at immigrants’ houses, or other crimes against Asian residents. Nearly everyone agrees that Quincy has come a long way toward shedding its racist rap. But racial tensions still exist. Read story....

Two Asian cops assigned as community officers in North Quincy address everything from building code violations, to translation needs, to tensions between residents. One teaches Tae Kwon Do at the local school. They’re involved in helping plan community events like the August Moon festival. They’re regularly seen riding around on their bicycles. And everybody knows them. Read story....


DAY 4: (published July 2, 2003)
Asians still aren’t involved in community life. Here’s what people are doing to tackle it: A Good Neighbor handbook explaining the importance of newcomers getting involved in the civic process, a quarterly newsletter in multiple languages containing information about services available and upcoming events and more Asian-language programming on local TV, to name a few. Read story....

Much has been written and said about Quincy's 9,000 or so Chinese residents, who comprise more than two-thirds of the city's overall Asian population. While the relatively new Indian community may be small by comparison, it was the fastest growing subgroup of Asians during the previous decade. Read story....

Started by Peter Jae in 1988, the Quincy Chinese School is a non-profit educational institution, the only lan guage school of its kind in the South Shore area. The school strives to edu cate Chinese-American children in the Cantonese language, motivating stu dents to become knowledgeable of tra ditional customs and culture. Read story....


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