SERIES SUMMARY   – Sept. 7 | Sept. 9  | Sept. 10 | Sept. 11


Sept. 7, 2002 - Are we ready?

  • South Shore
    victims
    ARE WE READY?: During the days after Sept. 11, acting-Gov. Jane Swift and other state officials promised sweeping changes in state security to guard against future terrorist attacks. A year later, Swift and legislators are pointing fingers at each other over their security failures. Read more...
  • IN NEED OF FUNDS: TOWN BY TOWN ... Local police and fire chiefs watched and listened intently for months while national leaders repeatedly stressed the critical need to upgrade public safety agencies in the aftermath of Sept. 11. Programs were unveiled to provide training, equipment and manpower. Grants were announced. Hopes were high. One year later, the status quo remains largely intact. Read more...
  • HOW SECURE?: Since Sept. 11, measures have been put in place to keep sites considered possible targets safe from terrorists, although visits to a select few demonstrate that the extent and tightness of security varies. Read more...
  • PORTS OF ENTRY: A drive from Cape Cod to downtown Boston reveals countless spots where a terrorist could illegally enter the state without setting foot in Logan International Airport. Read more...
  • BIO-TERRORISM: Dr. Richard Herman believed he and his emergency room at Brockton Hospital could handle any disaster. That was before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and subsequent anthrax mailings introduced a new possibility to his imagination: bioterrorism. Read more...
  • NO MONEY: Cities and towns in Massachusetts have yet to receive any money to fight terrorism. Read more...

Sept. 9, 2002 - Life as we know it

  • A LOT OF UNEASE: A year later, Cheryl Princiotta of Weymouth is still afraid to fly. Maura Heidcamp of Plymouth has dreams that she’s lost. The shock and disbelief of the terrorist attacks has worn off for them, but in the back of their minds the unease is still there. Read more...
  • TEACHING HISTORY: South Shore principals say they have no plans to refocus courses on international history, world geography or the political upheaval in the Middle East. Instead, they will hold moments of silence, assemblies and class discussions to deal with the one-year anniversary. Read more...

Sept. 10, 2002 - America at war

  • WORRIED WAIT: For American families with loved ones in the military, armed services, the months since after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks have been difficult ones - fraught with worry, fear and anger. Read more...
  • EAGER RECRUITS: JoAnne Bastable planned to join the Army even before Sept. 11. The terrorist attacks of that day and the ensuing war on terrorism only made her more eager to enlist. For the nation, a sudden surge in patriotism following the attacks has translated into a large supply of eager military recruits. Read more...

Sept. 11, 2002 - In memoriam

  • WE REMEMBER: A year later, the families of the victims can think of little else. On some days, relatives of World Trade Center victims say they can still hear the towers collapsing, even see glass and steel flying through a crisp September sky. Read more...
  • STATE OF GRACE: Through moments of silence and by attendance at vigils, church services and school assemblies, residents across the South Shore display their reverence for the thousands of people who died. Read more...
  • HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: As the planes struck and the towers collapsed, as black smoke covered Manhattan and thousands fled through the streets, Eleanor Reidy asked herself: “What is going to happen to this country? We fought for liberty and justice and freedom, and I thought they (my generation) had saved the world.” Read more...
  • WHERE WE WERE: Like the assassination of President Kennedy, the Cuban Missile Crisis or Pearl Harbor, most people will never forget where they were and what they were doing when they got the news.. Read more...
  • MOVING FORWARD: Without realizing she was doing it, or necessarily wanting to, Christie Coombs has become a public face of the Sept. 11 tragedy for the South Shore and much of Massachusetts. Read more...
  • OUR SURVEY: View the results of our survey of South Shore residents and their thoughts of the Sept. 11 tragedy and aftermath. Read more...
Write to us at 9/11@ledger.com

View The Patriot Ledger's survey results
Patriot Ledger Sept. 11 Survey Results

Download our reprinted special report:
"AMERICA ATTACKED"
Click to download PDF of America Attacked reprint

Slides of wire, staff images

Images from Mirana Comstock, a native New Yorker who lives in Hull.

I remember Sept. 11 starting out as a pretty normal day. It was a beautiful sunny day and I remember being stuck in traffic, which made me a half-hour late to work.

I turned on my computer, and there was the news of the first plane hitting the World Trade Center tower. I could not believe it. I asked my boss, who used to be an air traffic controller, how a plane could make such an error and fly into a building. Before we knew it was a commercial airliner, we both assumed it was a private plane which had mechanical problems. To our horror and dismay, it was not, and then the report of the next plane came through on the Internet. Our office became a Mecca of questions, concerns and downright disbelief of what was happening.

I also felt isolated, since I wasn't near a TV and was relying on radio and the Internet for answers. All that I wanted to do was get out of Boston and go home to my son. My heart was filled with sadness for all the families that were affected directly by this act of terrorism.

In the next few weeks I saw a country pull together and heal with the help of a strong sense of patriotism. I am blessed that I have the backing of such a great country, and my life will forever be changed by the events of Sept. 11.

KIM POWERS,
Hanover